Thursday, June 02, 2005

The Cambodian Wedding

Due to a few comments I have received - interestingly, from people who identified only as "anonymous" - I have removed this post which described my experiences and reflections upon a Cambodian wedding that I attended in Lowell, MA.

11 comments:

Dr. Zoom said...

Good to hear from you. Fascinating tale. Once again, you have proven yourself the quintessential blogger.

MzOuiser said...

Thanks Doc, it's good to be scribblin' again. And nice pic!

Craig said...

Ahhh, ha haaa! Very descriptive, my dear. I think even Einstein would have been confounded by the fluid relationship between Cambodians and time. This definitely gives a whole new perspective to the culture. HEY, looking forward to blogging about your own wedding! Hmmm?? - C.

MzOuiser said...

Craig: Ahhh, hahaha indeed! *fidget*

mark said...

Hold on a minute....so you're saying that every woman in the state of Texas was sent an invitation to this wedding? Who knew....

Kayo Kid said...

Hope that *cough* is all cleared up by now. You should come to Brooklyn and eat with us at the unimaginatively named Cambodian Cuisine in Fort Greene. It's reportedly the only Cambodian restaurant in NYC. I have two words for the food: Yum-my!

Wayne said...

and MzOuiser has the NICEST ass in the WORLD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

untchbl said...

I just attended a Cambodian wedding today. I've been to a handful of receptions in Cambodian restaurants in Lowell, Massachusetts over the years, but this was the actual traditional wedding ceremony where offerings of food, Hennessy and cigarettes were made with incense and candles on the living room floor. While the bride's father gave his blessing, we all threw little flower buds at the couple. [the flower buds came from this huge 3-foot-tall pod, that was cut, they told me, from a tree similar to a palm in Cambodia-I asked and they let me bring the pod home because the thing was so intriguing] Then we each offered our blessings to the bride and groom individually, while tying yellow-dyed strings, dipped in water from a silver cup, around the right wrists of the couple. I was told that the yellow was for good luck and the couple is supposed to leave the string on until it falls off naturally, at which time the bride and groom's strings are tied together and kept in a safe place (for a long-lasting marriage). The entire ceremony was endured while sitting on the floor with both legs bent and pointing to the right. Some of the foods we ate later were yoám (a chicken salad mixed with rice noodles and thai basil leaves) and bôk-lahong, as I will spell it (an extremely spicy papaya salad that was also sweet and salty). The poultry you ate at your wedding was probably quail.

MzOuiser said...

Anthony: I knew I was missing all the good stuff! I'm sure you'd have made a much better date. *sigh*

Anonymous said...

Thank you for the great info; now I know what to expect at the wedding we're invited to next month...

KENG said...

Okay an explanation to the start of the reception...yes the wedding reception does state it starts at 6 pm but thats when all the guests arrive and the wedding party greets each guest at the door where they can take pictures with them and usually is given a flower to wear. Then guests then goes to their table and chat and mingle with friends. The food is not served until 8 pm (serving of food is not the beginning of the reception) That is how things are done not because Cambodians are all late (that's just ur date haha) but that is the schedule of things.